British Sign Language Screens viewed from the concourse at London Euston

London Euston has become the first railway station in the country to provide the latest passenger information using British Sign Language in our latest effort to make the railway accessible to everyone.

Ten passenger information touch screens have gone live around the station – one of the 20 stations managed directly by us at Network Rail.

We'll install another 10 by the end of the year and will soon unveil an additional large screen beside the arrival and departure boards on the main concourse.

Watch this video to find out more:

We've invested a total of £1.1m to develop the software needed and install the British Sign Language screens at Euston.

The touch screens have been developed in a pioneering partnership with Leicester-based British Sign Language company Clarion UK and Nottingham-based screen manufacturer LB Foster.

Clarion UK's Sign Language interpreters have created a library of standard messaging as part of the screen software.

But in a railway first, its staff will provide passengers with signed information as situations evolve or during periods of unexpected disruption.

Within an hour, messaging can be turned into British Sign Language and uploaded directly to the screens using 4G technology.

Loraine Martins, director of diversity and inclusion at Network Rail, said: “We understand that rail travel can be daunting for anyone with specific needs and we’re always looking at ways we can improve accessibility so everyone can travel with confidence.

“We’re really excited to have these screens installed and in action, to see the real difference they will make for passengers who use British Sign Language. Euston station is proud to be leading the way, and I look forward to a time in the not too distant future when screens like these will be the norm on the railway and not an exception.”

We hope to roll out the British Sign Language screens to the other 19 stations we manage ourselves across the country.

Inclusive design and Access for All

The screens are the latest example of our efforts to make the railway accessible to everybody through inclusive design. It aims to deliver spaces and places for everyone.

When achieved, it means that everyone benefits from the full range of services and opportunities we offer.

The screens are the latest example of our efforts to make the railway accessible to everybody through inclusive design. It aims to deliver spaces and places for everyone.

When achieved, it means that everyone benefits from the full range of services and opportunities we offer.

Among other things, it involves providing for flexibility in use, offering more than one solution to help balance everyone’s needs; and providing buildings and environments that are convenient and enjoyable for all.

One of the industry's biggest initiatives is the Access for All programme, which provides obstacle-free, accessible route to and between platforms to improve travel. Better facilities include step-free travel at stations, lifts for customers and accessible footbridges with ramps.

In April, we introduced two new facilities to make the railway more inclusive at stations we own and directly manage in our Southern region. They'll benefit you if you use British Sign Language or if you're blind or visually impaired.

Freestanding British Sign Language passenger information screen
One of the British Sign Language passenger information touch screens

The first – SignLive – is an around the clock sign language interpretation service. This will mean you can keep up to date with station announcements and safety information if you're deaf or hearing impaired, no matter the time of day.

The second – RoomMate – is an electronic, wall mounted device that gives blind and visually impaired passengers a bespoke audio description in an accessible toilet.

Other examples of our improvements include the assisted travel lounge we opened two years ago at Birmingham New Street station. It provides a welcoming waiting space for people with additional mobility and sensory needs. A dedicated team is on hand to help them.

Read more:

Inclusive design

Access for All update April 2021

Access for All Programme

Station improvements

Planning a trip

Access for All: assisted travel lounge opens in Birmingham

Winning design to improve smaller stations

Rail Alphabet 2 launches at exhibition celebrating 1960s design icon