The Inside Track: Working at Christmas

Meet David, Ailsa and Barry – the voices and face of our Christmas Check Before You Travel campaign.

All three will be working during the Christmas and New Year bank holiday, helping us to deliver our programme of improvements as part of the Railway Upgrade Plan.

Ailsa and David have been announcing our Christmas work on selected radio stations nationally, while Barry has been on posters and screens in stations, reminding passengers to check their journeys before travelling this Christmas and New Year.

Ailsa is a scheme project manager (platform level access and wayfinding) on the High Capacity Infrastructure Project, Thameslink Programme

“This Christmas I’ll be working nights from Saturday 23 December until Saturday 30 December.”

New accessibility features

“I’ve been working on the level access project, developing platform humps across Thameslink Core stations to assist people with accessibility requirements. The humps raise the height of the platform to align with the Thameslink Class 700 accessibility train carriages.

“Another way we’re improving accessibility for passengers this Christmas is by developing flexible gap filler, which will further close the distance between the train and platform edge.

Developing these solutions has given me a real sense of achievement. It’s nice to know that what we are doing is going to assist our customers through our railway for many years to come.”

Team effort

“From Network Rail there’s about four or five of us on each shift from our team, and they’ll feed into teams from other parts of the Thameslink Programme, working alongside the principal contractor and the subcontractor for the installation. It’s a real team effort.

“I don’t usually work over Christmas, but I couldn’t miss this – I’d been working towards the project delivery, so I wanted to be there to see it through. Usually I’d split the time over Christmas between my husband’s family in Cheshire and my family in Perthshire, Scotland.”

What’s next?

“I also work on the ‘wayfinding’ project, improving signage to make it clearer for passengers where to go as soon as the train stops so they can leave the platforms as quickly as possible. This will mean less crowding, which will be really important with 24 trains per hour. There’ll be more work on this in spring.”

Click here to hear Ailsa on the radio.

Ailsa is a scheme project manager (platform level access and wayfinding) on the High Capacity Infrastructure Project, Thameslink Programme

“This Christmas I’ll be working nights from Saturday 23 December until Saturday 30 December.”

New accessibility features

“I’ve been working on the level access project, developing platform humps across Thameslink Core stations to assist people with accessibility requirements. The humps raise the height of the platform to align with the Thameslink Class 700 accessibility train carriages.

“Another way we’re improving accessibility for passengers this Christmas is by developing flexible gap filler, which will further close the distance between the train and platform edge.

Developing these solutions has given me a real sense of achievement. It’s nice to know that what we are doing is going to assist our customers through our railway for many years to come.”

Team effort

“From Network Rail there’s about four or five of us on each shift from our team, and they’ll feed into teams from other parts of the Thameslink Programme, working alongside the principal contractor and the subcontractor for the installation. It’s a real team effort.

“I don’t usually work over Christmas, but I couldn’t miss this – I’d been working towards the project delivery, so I wanted to be there to see it through. Usually I’d split the time over Christmas between my husband’s family in Cheshire and my family in Perthshire, Scotland.”

What’s next?

“I also work on the ‘wayfinding’ project, improving signage to make it clearer for passengers where to go as soon as the train stops so they can leave the platforms as quickly as possible. This will mean less crowding, which will be really important with 24 trains per hour. There’ll be more work on this in spring.”

Click here to hear Ailsa on the radio.

Automatic Train Operation and the Thameslink Programme

ATO is widely used in metro operation to increase the capacity of the infrastructure through delivery of consistent run times, management of dwell time and using the full capacity of the signalling system. On Thameslink it will allow the delivery of a 24 trains per hour service through the core area in 2018.

Teams from Network Rail are working closely with teams from Siemens, which provides the test train and trackside equipment, and from GTR, the train operating company.

The four core area Thameslink stations are St Pancras, Faringdon, City Thameslink and Blackfriars.