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  • History of King's Cross station

  • King's Cross is the London terminus for the east coast main line. Over 40 million people pass through the station each year.

    Phase one of the King's Cross redevelopment project completed with the opening of the new western departures concourse in March 2012.

    It is rumoured that Queen Boudicea is buried beneath platform 8.

    Future developments

    The second and final stage of the redevelopment of King's Cross will be the removal of the 1973 extension and the restoration of the original facade. Passengers will leave through the front of the station onto a new public square.

    This phase of the project will start after the Olympics and end in late 2013. Find out what's happening at King's Cross.

    Chronology

    • The first temporary station was built by Great Northern Railway at Maiden Lane in 1850 but closed two years later
    • The present station opened on 14 October 1852
    • The Great Northern Hotel opened on 17 May 1854
    • The Metropolitan Railway connection opened on 1 October 1863 with the York Road platform opening on 1 January 1866
    • The main line local station opened on 18 December 1874
    • The suburban station opened on 1 February 1878, was extended in 1880 and then rebuilt in 1895
    • The local station was extended and opened on 15 December 1924
    • The present concourse and travel centre opened on 3 June 1973 while the suburban and York Road platforms closed on 4 March 1977
    • A new concourse covered by a 1,700 tonne steel and glass dome opened in March 2012. The redevelopment included renovating the Grade 1 listed building to the highest possible standard and connects the station to the Great Northern Hotel

    Station design

    • The 1852 station was designed by the architect, Lewis Cubitt, whose uncle and cousin were engineers on the construction of the Great Northern Railway; he also designed the Great Northern hotel
    • The station roof, the largest at the time, was supposedly modelled on the riding school of the Czars of Moscow
    • The station was built by John and William Jay of the Euston Road
    • The land was acquired for £65,000 and the station cost £123,500 to build
    • The train shed comprises two vaults of clear arch construction; the ribs supporting the roof covering were originally of laminated timber but were replaced in steel
    • The roof spans are 105ft wide by 800ft long
  • Maps