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  • Category A Signals Passed At Danger (SPADs)

  • Definition

    This measure reports all Category A Signals Passed At Danger (SPADs), where signals have been passed when a stop aspect, end of in-cab signalled movement authority, or indication (and any associated preceding cautionary indications) was displayed correctly and in sufficient time for the train to be stopped safely at the signal or end of in-cab movement authority. The table shows the number of Category A SPADs for 2013/14 compared with previous years.

    Results

      2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15

    England & Wales

    255

    272

    247

    234

    274

    277

    Scotland

    19

    27

    29

    15

    18

    26

    Network-wide

    274

    299

    276

    249

    292

    303

    Network-wide (Ranked A to D - where the train reached the fouling point)

    30

    40

    26

    22

    22

    31

    Notes: Previous year's figures have been updated to reflect the outcome of investigations and re-categorisation of incidents.

    Commentary

    There were 303 Category A SPADs during the year compared with 292 last year, and the figure is above the four year average of 249.

    The MAA (normalised per thousand signals) is 0.66, which is 14.9 per cent worse than the year-end target of 0.57 and 4.5 per cent worse than last year.

    Of the 303 Category A SPADs, there were 31 instances where the train reached the fouling point. One of the 31 signals involved was fitted with Train Protection Warning System (TPWS). This is an increase in instances reached the fouling point on the previous year (when six of the 22 signals were fitted with TPWS). Four of the 31 instances resulted in derailment compared with three in the previous year. We continue to work with rail industry colleagues to address and reduce risks leading to SPADs.